Otherwise entitled: One little, two little, three little mozzie bites.

We headed out early to catch our flight to Abu Simbel, location of the famed temple of Ramses II. Egypt airport security was pretty chill– we walked through security on our way in the doors and didn’t need an ID at any point. The flight was short, and I discovered that the man whose article I had read on the flight over and who had been filming in the Egyptian museum was actually a really important Egyptologist– Dr. Zahi Dawass. Check BBC in a few months– maybe I made the cut!

Abu Simbel was incredible. No other way to describe it. It’s set up where you have to walk around the back of the temple to get to the front and so all of a sudden the sculptures just appear. It’s actually two temples– one that Ramses II built to himself and one he built for his wife Nefertari. It’s a significant temple because it was built to a man, rather than to a god. Below, the front of the temple of Ramses II.

 The inside of the temple was incredible as well. The colors and drawings were beautiful- I can only imagine what they must have looked like when it was first built. Photo credit goes to google– no photos allowed inside the temples.

Below is the front of the temple built to honor Nefertari.

After an exciting morning, we headed back to the hotel to shower before boarding our next means of transport– a felucca! A felucca is an Egyptian boat (see below). It zigzags up the Nile and is a quite peaceful way to travel (except for when it’s miserably hot or you’re being attacked by mosquitoes). We spent two nights on the felucca and an entire day, and didn’t actually end up getting much of anywhere because it was too windy! Below, a felucca, courtesy google, and our dinner spread the first night.

 https://i2.wp.com/cache.virtualtourist.com/1771816-Felucca_on_the_Nile-Egypt.jpg

 Definitely an Egyptian experience! We learned a lot about each other and shared our customs and culture with Adel, as he did with us. While I don’t agree with many Egyptian views, particularly regarding women, it was a fascinating conversation.

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